Une idée sinon vraie…

  • Bozzini Quartet / Also pictured: Isabelle Bozzini, Clemens Merkel, Stéphanie Bozzini, Alissa Cheung / Une idée sinon vraie…, Amphithéâtre – Le Gesù, Montréal (Québec) [Photograph: Raphael Thibodeau, January 25, 2019]
  • Bozzini Quartet / Also pictured: Isabelle Bozzini, Clemens Merkel, Stéphanie Bozzini, Marc Boivin, Alissa Cheung / Une idée sinon vraie…, Amphithéâtre – Le Gesù, Montréal (Québec) [Photograph: Raphael Thibodeau, January 25, 2019]
  • Bozzini Quartet / Also pictured: Alissa Cheung, Marc Boivin, Clemens Merkel, Isabelle Bozzini, Stéphanie Bozzini / Une idée sinon vraie…, Amphithéâtre – Le Gesù, Montréal (Québec) [Photograph: Raphael Thibodeau, January 25, 2019]
  • Marc Boivin, Stéphanie Bozzini / Une idée sinon vraie…, Amphithéâtre – Le Gesù, Montréal (Québec) [Photograph: Raphael Thibodeau, January 25, 2019]
  • Alissa Cheung / Une idée sinon vraie…, Amphithéâtre – Le Gesù, Montréal (Québec) [Photograph: Raphael Thibodeau, January 25, 2019]
  • Bozzini Quartet / Also pictured: Alissa Cheung, Marc Boivin, Clemens Merkel, Isabelle Bozzini, Stéphanie Bozzini / Une idée sinon vraie…, Amphithéâtre – Le Gesù, Montréal (Québec) [Photograph: Raphael Thibodeau, January 25, 2019]

Participants

Programme

Description

This event is part of the Une idée sinon vraie… project.

In a dialogue between the body and music, between past and present, Une idée sinon vraie… offers an exploration and journey into the heart of identity; collaboration; music and movement; the spatialization of a statement; the dramatization of an idea developed by a dancer and four musicians, like a troupe performing in a public square.

Set to Ana Sokolović’s Commedia dell’arte I et II, a musical composition inspired by the archetypal figures from this theatrical form, this performance is a tight-knit collaboration between choreographer and dancer Marc Boivin and the Quatuor Bozzini. The score proposes a “mise en abyme” of the many emblematic characters in Commedia dell’arte. Like a Russian doll, it navigates through each character in an effort to understand their essence, their universal proportions eliciting feelings of vertigo, and their irrevocable attractions to the mysteries of the individual, questioning our own freedom of being.

In a troubling interpretation made with great attention to detail, Marc Boivin and the four musicians on stage perform a perfectly-executed exercise in style. Far from theatrical norms, they confront the idea — if not true, at least conceivable — of who we are, and of our vulnerable and changing perception of reality.